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danhunt

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danhunt last won the day on April 20

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About danhunt

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  • Birthday 02/15/1978

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  1. Thanks for the heads up, Ray! I was just contemplating putting in an order with them.
  2. My understanding is the same as yours provided that it is a navigable waterway (not flowing only seasonally or prone to drying up completely in certain years), not federally controlled land (eg military bases and/or native land reserves) or lands that were originally deeded by the Hudson's Bay Company (there is one of these on the Crowsnest where the bed and breakfast is). I'm curious, was this just upstream of the campground? If not, the land owner who owns the home on the north bank of that section upstream of the bridge seems to have a creative interpretation of river access laws as well. I think all you can do is stay polite, state your case and encourage them to call the RCMP if they disagree. If they threaten you, offer to call the RCMP on their behalf. If they threaten you with a weapon, apologize, leave, and as soon as you're safe definitely call the RCMP.
  3. Hello All, I'm wondering if anyone out there would be able/willing to turn a wooden reel seat insert for me, or if you could recommend someone? Long story short, I got a bad spacer from a manufacturer and they don't seem to want to do anything about it, so I thought this might be an option to use the skeleton rather than throwing in the parts bin and ordering a whole new unit. I'd be happy to pay for the time and materials, just let me know. Thanks!
  4. I don’t know if this is might be one of those things that is so dumb it’s brilliant, but here goes… I have a jon boat with a regular height transom and I have a long leg outboard. I was thinking of selling the outboard because I really didn’t want/need the prop sitting that far down. On the other hand, the tiller of the outboard isn’t quite high enough for my tastes, as it kind of hits my leg when I try to change direction, and then it occurred to me - could I build an extension to raise my transom 4” – 5” out of plywood (I’m picturing kind of a U shaped sleeve) that slips down over the transom solving both problems at once? I don’t want to damage my boat or loose my motor, but I’m thinking sheet aluminum doesn’t have that much strength on its own, and its usually just plywood reinforcing the transom anyway, isn’t it? As long as the “bite” of the motor clamp is wide enough and as long I secure the extension to the boat it might work? Thoughts?
  5. danhunt

    Setup

    As others have said, you'd probably be better served something in the 3-5wt range for the kind of fishing you describe. To give you some perspective, an 8wt is commonly used for coho, steelies, chum, and it might be on the light end (depending on the rod) but do-able for springs. If you're on here I'm guessing you're in AB, and looking to fish AB streams - a 5wt may be overkill for some of the truly small stream fishing, but it's a very versatile weight for the east slopes and it will work well for about 90% of what you're likely to encounter. A medium fast action rod is probably where you'd want to start, depending on your budget you could spend $150 for something like a TFO Sig II to the sky is the limit. As far as a line is concerned, you'll want a weight forward (WF) floating line (F) to start but this is where things get a little dicey - you can spend a $1000 on a high end rod, but if you put the wrong line on it, its like putting 13" rims on a monster truck. Go to a flyshop, tell them what you're planning to do and what your budget is and they should be able to set you up. If that's not practical for your circumstances, then generally speaking more "traditional" tapers like a cortland 444 or a Rio Gold match better with M/F action rods. Lines like the Mastery MPX, Rio Grand, etc tend to have more aggressive tapers and are typically about a half a line size heavy for their given rating, which helps load fast to extra fast action rods, but may overwhelm a slower action. For leaders, I typically get something like a 9' 1x -3x and then tie a 3x-5x tippet to them, but a 1x or 2x with a 4x tippet is probably what I use the most.
  6. There is nothing corrupt about the concept of farming fish for food (or any other intensive livestock operation), the corruption comes when it is done at the expense of the public interest or (in the case of terrestrial based intensive livestock) unless the animals are being raised in a less than humane manner or fed an improper diet. If poultry producers (just a for instance, nothing against them and I’m not suggesting this is how they actually operate) were indiscriminately spraying waste, feathers, entrails, parasites, viruses and chemicals in the surrounding environment how long would they be allowed to practise those farming methods before they were forced to change? Especially if those methods impacted wildlife on a large scale? As far as the inability of commercial fishing of wild salmon (including hatchery augmented runs) to meet consumer demand, I have to say so what? Where does it say we (Canadians) have to sacrifice a public resource in the name of private interests, especially for an industry that is 90% foreign owned? There is also no biological requirement that we as a species eat salmon in order to survive. In fact, the two most populated countries in the world (China and India) got there without salmon ever being a significant part of their diets. I would agree that there are other stressors like climate change, open ocean survival, etc that come in to play but the decline of the Fraser River Sockeye, as an example, lines up pretty well with the increase in the size and number of net pen Atlantic salmon farms off the west coast of BC. I know there are steps being taken to develop land based closed system salmon farms and if/when they do, if those practices are ultimately sustainable, then I will have no problem with farmed salmon. As I understand it, the technology to make it work is available now, it is just too costly to economically viable at this point. If the salmon farming industry were forced to practice more sustainable farming methods that were more in line with other types of intensive livestock production, then the consumer would be forced to pay for the true cost of the product. At that point letting consumer demand for the product regulate production would probably work. As stated previously, right now it’s just a cheap source of protein and, based on conversations I’ve had with friends and colleagues, I believe the general public only has a passing interest and/or knowledge of the risks involved. On the one hand, I applaud trying to take a balanced and holistic view of the needs of society and how fisheries and recreational fishing fits in to the bigger picture. That is a mature and reasonable thing to do. On the other hand, that is not the world we live in. The political will that controls these kinds decisions is steered by which special interest groups contribute the most to their election war chests and/or by which groups hold the most sway over public opinion. Mining, forestry, agriculture, etc all have their own lobbies and they don’t need our (anglers) help. As I have said previously, I am not against special licensing, increased fees, angling restrictions etc if they are necessary as part of the larger picture. However, I do not believe they are effective on their own their own. If you need an example how this plays out look at the Thompson River Steelhead. When I last fished it in 2005 the run was down from the historical 10,000 + fish to an estimated 1500. At that time angling restrictions in the form of zero retention, a bait ban, single barbless hooks, reduced angling seasons (in some years, no recreational angling at all), classified waters designation and a special conservation surcharge were all in place. In the nearly 15 years since I last fished it the returns have fallen further from 1500 to 86 fish in 2019. Why? The same factors as the Fraser River sockeye plus the bycatch in the lower Fraser gillnet fishery for chum salmon, which still goes on. To tie it all together, the issue in BC is the same as the issue in Alberta – conservation. And, unfortunately, conservation without addressing the root causes of the problems (what ever they are) will have little appreciable impact over the long term.
  7. Great video, thanks for sharing! I’ve been intrigued by the GT since I saw that Blueplanet video of them taking sea birds out of mid-air.
  8. Fishteck, how exactly are you involved in fisheries management? The reason I ask is because of your comments on the “Artifishal” post where you mentioned you thought the crowd over-reacted with respect to the potential impact of fish farms on wild stocks, the cost of fish hatcheries to society, and rationalized fish farms as “ a commercial cost efficient food source”. The literal decimation of socially, culturally and economically valuable wild salmon and steelhead stocks, to the tune of millions of fish, in order maintain of cheap source of protein hardly speaks of the "enlightened" conservation ethic you seem to be promoting here. That made me take a closer look at what you’ve been saying here and in the related Bow river threads. I am paraphrasing so feel free to take me to task if I misquote, but you’ve effectively said that stocking the Bow to supplement declining stocks is off the table, changing industry practices is unfeasible, and the only practical way to preserve fish stocks is for one of the primary stake holders of the resource (anglers) to be excluded (through a combination of voluntary abstinence, by increasing the cost to access the resource, or with regulations limiting access). However, you are OK with increasing stocking and/or angling effort on other water bodies in the province. All of which will have the combined effect of reducing the recreational value of the Bow and the other streams of the east slopes, making them more susceptible to being further impacted by industry in the future. So who do you represent? Are you speaking on behalf of anglers or are you working to influence angler’s opinions on behalf of some other group?
  9. Thanks for the post, I really enjoy Todd Moen's work. Cool fish too, kind of like fishing tarpon in a farm pond!
  10. Hi Don, Did you make it to the meeting? If so, how did it play out?
  11. Fishteck, Does the creel survey capture the average size of fish caught? Another conclusion that could be drawn from that data is that if the population is falling, and if there is a collapse in certain age classes but catch rates remain relatively stable then those age classes that are collapsing don’t make up a significant portion of the catch and never have. I am not trying to say I think I have the right to fish how and when I want, fish populations be damned or something stupid like that. What I am saying is something more substantial and more meaningful needs to be done to prevent the coming collapse of the Bow River fishery. Once the actual issues are identified, if angling restrictions need to be part of the conversation then I’m fine with that. But if this is the best the AEP can do then we either need to give the AEP better tools to work with or we need to start lobbying the powers that be to get some new blood in that department because, in my opinion, this isn’t getting it done.
  12. So on the one hand AEP is saying that there are enough juvenile fish to support natural recruitment, but something is happening to the 1+ & 2+ age classes that is causing a significant portion of these fish to die (presumably before they can spawn?). The parasite that causes whirling disease is in the upper Bow Watershed, but no clinical cases have been observed in the “Blue Ribbon Stretch” of the Bow, so it is unknown what impact (if any) whirling disease is having on the fish population. That said, the report notes that biologists on the Colorado river in 1993 & 1994 observed a complete collapse in the 1+ & 2+ age classes and that such a collapse did not occur in the older age classes of fish. So what anglers have been observing on the river in recent years is exactly what might be expected if the Bow was following the same sort of pattern that the Colorado did 25 years ago. But on the other hand, it could be hooking mortality in those 1+ & 2+ age classes that anglers are reporting that they are not catching. Because they are not there as evidenced by the population samples. How is an angling restriction going to help protect fish that aren’t there and aren’t being caught?
  13. Sorry, I should clarify as the intention of having adult fish return to spawn is also the goal with pacific salmon fisheries. The difference in my mind is that the salmon fisheries have a commercial component that harvests a certain portion of the return, so continual input is required.
  14. That looks interesting bcubed and I’ll try and to watch it tonight, but I’ll take a stab at where it’s going - the offspring of hatchery raised fish are less reproductively fit than their wild counterparts? True, but very little research has been done on the reproductive fitness of subsequent generations. Again, Bow River rainbows originally come from Northern California, but have naturalized and formed (until recently) a self sustaining population, so it would seem possible to wean off the hatchery teat. The only reason I suggest adding hatchery fish to the mix (with some different genetics) is to try and get more adult fish to the redds and to have more of their offspring make it to adulthood to eventually do the same.
  15. An ever-increasing number of anglers – Not sure this is true. I couldn’t find older data, but the total number of licenses sold in AB seem to be trending the same way as the resource economy in the province and have gone from 280425 in 2014, 318106 in 2015, 312064 in 2016, 309006 in 2017 to 281568 in 2018. I would agree that these numbers don’t necessarily give an accurate measure of how many anglers use the Bow. The AEP Bow River Fish Population Survey suggests that recruitment of trout stocks is adequate in the Bow River to sustain the population – Fair enough, but this doesn’t reflect the experience of myself and other anglers who have noticed a distinct lack of smaller fish in the river in recent years. It also ties in with the next point; Unknown fish population and reproduction dynamics – Don’t mean to nitpick, but if the fish population and reproduction dynamics are unknown then how can the AEP Bow River Fish Population Survey suggest that recruitment of trout stocks is adequate in the Bow River to sustain the population? Seems like a chicken/egg debate? What I would like to know is how closely does the decline of the Bow River’s trout populations resemble the decline of other well known trout rivers in the US that have been exposed to the parasite that causes whirling disease? I doubt the data exists to make a real comparison, but anecdotally it seems all too similar. My $0.02 Charge a conservation fee/stamp/license to fish the Bow, say $50 a year. Double that for alien/non-resident anglers just for giggles. Put the money directly back in to managing and enhancing the Bow River fishery so that the powers that be can obtain meaningful data and develop targeted solutions. Some rough data can be obtained just from the license sales, but with this stamp/fee/license include a link to a website (or a paper form, for the technologically challenged) that can be used to voluntarily report how many anglers are using the river, when, where and what the results were with idea of using this data in future management. As part of the management plan start stocking a strain of Rainbows in the Bow that are naturally resistant to the parasite that causes whirling disease (e.g. Hofer X Harrison strain rainbows) with the goal of augmenting natural recruitment until populations stabilize. The rainbow trout in the Bow were originally from a river in northern California, so maintaining the genetics of the existing stock are kind of a moot point, and the cutties aren’t likely to make a comeback below the Ghost anyway. Colorado hatcheries are raising these rainbows, so obtaining brood stock may be possible without having to reinvent the wheel.
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