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FishnChips

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FishnChips last won the day on April 24

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About FishnChips

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    Baetis Nymph

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    Bow Valley

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  1. I agree with all our friends’ earlier remarks. I love maps and map reading and us them to plot detailed paths along streams, and conservatively, I cover 2-3 km each way so 4-6 km round trip in a 6-8 hour outing in a foothills creek. On a well known larger river, I usually arrange a drop off and pick up. 5 km is a huge 8-9 hour day. Wading against knee/mid-thigh 6-8 kmh current uses a lot of energy. A large number of factors affect energy. Age, physical condition, motivation, hydration... terrain is critical as bushwhacking, climbing, standing on uneven or less than ideally stable ground increases output. Weather is super important as body temperature is affected by clothing, or lack of it. Students are almost always working harder than their instructors to start...
  2. We have an abbreviation for this in the airforce: FUBAR. Stands for £¥€§ed Up Beyond All Recognition. All the profits to an Australian conglomerate from Albertan slave labour. I think I am going to throw up...
  3. Tight lines, thank you for the link to this monograph. It is well written and historically interesting even though the subject matter is not very exciting.
  4. I held this centrepin a few days ago, it is splendid. Beautifully executed and free wheels in balance that ie eye-watering in its precision.
  5. Good morning Brent, Excellent, thank you.
  6. I wish to ask a question. i have a 4WT bamboo Rod. The silver butt cap has come loose after 12.5 years. It is a light coloured walnut burl butt, with a non-threaded down locking reel seat. there is a small amount of light coloured original glue residue. Advice please, for secure re-attachment? Thank you.
  7. Lornce, I wish you a speedy recovery from your knee surgery. Like all the posters so far, (who is going to post non-compliance anyway?), international travel postponed, skiing gone for *hit, we are hunkered down prudently abiding healthy practices. We forage some grocery stores for necessities and make our monthly trip to Costco for a big shop. We are reading, chatting, eating and drinking well, watching the idiot-box, having video calls with offspring in far away places, ordering a few things online for a summer we hope to be able to make the most of and we watch for signs that the curve will flatten, fervent with hope.
  8. UCP cancels all vacations for the year 2020 until morale improves...
  9. Fishtek, Another informative link, thank you. I mostly fish the Upper Bow, and The Highwood, they are close to home. Retiring has allowed me to explore my home waters to a degree I never could before. I haven’t seen a stonefly during the summers of 2018 or 2019 on my home waters. Not one. I normally see them this area in early June to mid-July over the past 15 years. I do not have a huge interest in entomology, and identifying mayflies is challenging because I can’t always catch one. (I use my hat, sometimes I get lucky and one just lands on me, that is best). The fine details are hard to catalogue. The dark ones look just like the picture above, especially those random dark patches on otherwise clear wings. The late summer and fall Green Drake hatch was invisible to me during summer/fall 2019. I did not see any. Very few dark Mayflies all season. Lots of small pale and yellow sometimes with a greenish tinge. (Yellow Sallies I believe). I did not see any caddies. Dry fly action was slow and I was working on improving nymphing skills so the two dovetailed nicely and I noticed my catch rate from my diary stayed constant by going deeper with nymphing. Banff and Canmore both have state of the art sewage treatment plants. Since the last major upgrade a couple of decades ago, the fishing dropped off noticeably in my direct experience in this area and this is supported anecdotally by fishing acquaintances, guides and a locally raised conservation person who now lives and works in BC. This has left me with the perplexing conclusion that some kinds of effluent from sewage plants were good for the bugs and the fish. Is that the same as being good for the water itself? Or humans? Since the “clean up”, bugs and fish have declined. Is the water better? I am still mulling over which changes I am going to make for this coming season (20/21). We have a problem and I will be part of the solution. One thing I am considering is only fishing stocked waters period. I will give the wild fish (the naturals, the wilds and exotics) a break.
  10. Wow. Nice to have data but it is too bad the trial itself killed fish.
  11. My first Steelhead river as a wee lad. A very fine water. Tight lines!
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