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Just wondering when tying flys how many of the same pattern generally do you tie up at once ? 

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When I sit down to tie I will normally make each pattern and size by the dozen or more. This will keep me going for a while. I only have the materials that are needed on the tying table to reduce clutter and mess, this also makes the tying process more efficient. You don’t need to spend more time than you have to.

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Depends on my mood and the reason for tying. For patterns I use a lot a minimum of a doz. At times a half doz. but mostly by the dozen. I like to keep a small inventory of some patterns. Every tier will be different, some strive for just a few perfect patterns. There's also experimental patterns that I usually tie fewer of, sometimes as tests on the water.  Other times to just to figure out a pattern, these might get the blade three or four times before I'm satisfied.  No rules, just have fun tying. For me tying is like a Zen, I can bury myself in the tie without thinking.

c3pV74W.jpg

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It depends. If it's a tried and true pattern I like to have 6 of the best size on hand when on the water. If I'm tying up a new pattern or tweaking a tried and true for improvement I tie up 3 or 4 and test them. My fishing trips are always multi day trips and I always travel with my tying kit. I don't have need for huge numbers of any given pattern to have on hand. The more I fish lakes and streams coupled with years of experience I find my stock of go to patterns is relatively small. I'm a firm believer that timing and presentation are far more paramount to success then vast selection. Frequent tying sessions usually of short duration keep my tying skills sharp as opposed to infrequent long high number sessions.

The genisis of fly tying primarily for catcbing fish goes something like this: when starting out one ties alot of flies and many different patterns just to get good at it and is ever hopeful some of them will catch fish. As time goes on you get better at tying and fishing and as you become familiar with the waters you fish the number of patterns you need begins to narrow down. The ones that work become your stock and trade so to speak. They are confidence flies. You get really good at tying those, particularly dries. They catch fish. Your flies become more durable. You lose less of them when fishing as catching skill improves. Things seem to simplify at the vise and looking at a piece of water, particularly moving water. 

For some fly tying is as much or more of a creative endeavor then it is for filling the practicality of need. I'm somewhere in middle. All this said there's nothing like catching fish on bugs one has tied.

 

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On 10/6/2019 at 9:11 AM, SilverDoctor said:

Depends on my mood and the reason for tying. For patterns I use a lot a minimum of a doz. At times a half doz. but mostly by the dozen. I like to keep a small inventory of some patterns. Every tier will be different, some strive for just a few perfect patterns. There's also experimental patterns that I usually tie fewer of, sometimes as tests on the water.  Other times to just to figure out a pattern, these might get the blade three or four times before I'm satisfied.  No rules, just have fun tying. For me tying is like a Zen, I can bury myself in the tie without thinking.

c3pV74W.jpg

Gee, You think those might come in handy at this time of year......

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I just started to tie this fall. I typically tie 6 of each tested true fly. Once a week I’ll try to tie something that is a variance of a tested fly. I test them for a few days and if they do well for me I’ll tie more. I find when I create a new pike fly or walleye fly that it takes a few different techniques to structure it to the point that I can catch multiple pike before they destroy the fly.

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38 minutes ago, WayneM said:

I just started to tie this fall. I typically tie 6 of each tested true fly. Once a week I’ll try to tie something that is a variance of a tested fly. I test them for a few days and if they do well for me I’ll tie more. I find when I create a new pike fly or walleye fly that it takes a few different techniques to structure it to the point that I can catch multiple pike before they destroy the fly.

Welcome to the tying community. Wonderful to see people start in this side of the sport. Dont forget to post your flies here.

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