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Orvis last won the day on June 15 2017

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About Orvis

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    Cutthroat Trout

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  1. I frequently get requests for a podcast about drift boats, and although I enjoy rowing one most people don’t let me row their boat unless they are really desperate. So I called on an expert, Montana guide Hilary Hutcheson, to get her advice on getting a boat, rowing a boat, and most importantly all the responsibilities that go with getting down the river safely and with courtesy. Even if you never row a boat yourself, you’ll gain a new appreciation for the skill set your guide employs every day. In the Fly Box this week, we get these questions and tips: · How can a color-blind fly fisher identify the flies in his box? · Why am I only getting fish on my lower egg pattern in a two-fly rig? · A great suggestion on dealing with tippet rings · What kind of crab patterns do I need for striped bass? · What flies should I use for small stocked rainbows? · What are your thoughts on leader degreasers? · A suggestion on training as a whitewater guide prior to becoming a fishing guide · Why do black bucktails and marabou stain my hands? · What are some tips on purposely dumping your back cast? · What is the difference between a clear and a solid blue intermediate fly line? · Can I make a dubbing loop with monofilament tying thread? View the full article
  2. Panfish are the way many of us relieve the frustration of snotty trout, spooky carp, or saltwater fish that can't be reached because of bad weather. They're always on the prowl for a snack and seldom very fussy. But you do need to know where to find them, and for the larger specimens a little finesse is often in order. So this week I talk to Bart Lombardo, panfish aficionado and guru. We concentrate on the sunfish family. Although many smaller freshwater fish fit into the panfish category, sunfish are the most abundant and widely distributed. I think you find some great tips for maximizing your fun with these feisty little guys. In the Fly Box, here are some of the questions and tips we cover: Is there one rod I can use for both tightline (Euro) nymphing and dry flies? I found out why my knots were breaking on tippet rings! Rattles for redfish When you might want tapered leaders for bass What is the difference between freshwater and saltwater fly lines, and the difference between coldwater and warmwater lines? What lines do I need for coastal fishing in the Northeast? Do I need to take special care when wearing wading boots on my inflatable SUP? What do you eat to keep going during a full day of fishing? Can I imitate both Hendricksons and March Browns with one fly pattern? Can I use my 6-weight Clearwater rod for stocked trout? What does good carp water look like? View the full article
  3. How do I become a guide? Should I get a job as a guide? How do I train to be a fishing guide? What skills do I need? I get these questions all the time on podcast requests, and because I have neither the skills nor the temperament to be a guide I asked our good friends at World Cast Anglers, specifically Mike Dawkins, to talk about the guiding life. They should know as they probably employ more fly-fishing guides than any other operation, and they have also been running a guide school for years. Listen to this week’s podcast about the pleasures and perils of being a fly-fishing guide. In the Fly Box this week, here are a few of the questions I try to answer: · How do I land giant alligator gar? · Where should I put my weight in relation to my tippet ring? · What are your top three suggestions for teaching someone to fish with a fly rod? · Should I get a weight forward or double taper fly line? · Can I use tightline nymphing techniques when fishing downstream? · How do I simplify and lighten up my gear when backpacking? · I get corrected—a listener has seen seen trout eat adult early black stoneflies and yellow sallies · How do I fish a long, clear, shallow stretch with no riffles without spooking fish? · Is it OK to put a perfection loop in my fly line? · Can I use a sinking poly leader when indicator fishing? · Why am I losing fish that I have hooked while fishing nymphs during the winter? · Why did I not catch fish while fishing nymphs during the winter? View the full article
  4. *** This is a Backcast Episode from May 21, 2010. It is fun to see how much the show's format has changed since then! Thanks for listening!*** Tom thinks even the best casters can sometimes use a little help when it comes to line control. In this podcast he gives his top ten tips for what to do once your line hits the water. Have a suggestion for the podcast? Drop us a line at podcast@orvis.com. View the full article
  5. When we think of largemouth bass, most of us either have a vision of a small farm pond or a big wide-open lake. But there are many excellent largemouth bass fisheries in rivers. And the advantage for a fly fisher is that these fish never get into a zone where they are tough to target with a fly rod because they are always in shallow water. Texas has a number of great largemouth rivers, and this week I pick the brain of Winston Cundiff of All Water Guides in Austin, Texas. He shares his techniques for catching these fish, the tackle he uses, and the fly patterns he favors. I think fly-rod bass anglers from around the country will get some solid tips on catching largemouths in moving water. In The Fly Box this week, we explore a number of interesting questions and suggestions: · How are fly hooks tempered, and does bending a small hook in your tying vise weaken it? · Should you approach spooky small-stream trout in still pools from upstream or downstream? · How to make a 4X leader into a 7X leader. · Why do I keep missing strikes when fishing streamers? · What are some tips for catching trout in rivers with high fishing pressure? · Can I fish a soft hackle as a dropper behind a dry fly? · How can plus-size anglers sneak up on trout? · What is a level line? · A tip from a listener on how to avoid pricking your finger on the hook when tying flies. View the full article
  6. In answer to a question about flushing spaniels, Reid spends some time with his good friend and noted trainer Jerry Cacchio. The two drill down on the finer points of English Springer and English Cocker spaniels, trends in the breeding of each, and their greater applicability for North American hunting. View the full article
  7. I have gotten numerous requests on doing a podcast on fly fishing from a kayak and finally was able to corral my friend Damon Bungard of Jackson Kayaks, who has a broad experience fishing from kayaks all over the world, from tarpon flats to trout streams, and also designs kayaks. It’s a very detailed podcast, covering everything from picking the right craft to approaching fish to anchor systems to dealing with line handling to fighting and landing fish from a kayak. And lots of good stories in between. Fly fishers have different needs than conventional anglers when it comes to kayak fishing, so I am sure you will benefit from the wisdom of a true expert. Also in the Fly Box we cover questions on: · Whether you find the same hatches on different stretches of a river · Why a guide had an angler fight a fish with the rod in a vertical position · How far upstream to cast a nymph with an indicator, and how much to let it hang downstream · Will there be a kit to convert a Helios 3 D version to an F version (no, sorry they are totally different tapers) · Why are my knots breaking at the tippet ring but not when I attach it to a fly? · Are mop flies evil? · Why did I not have the same luck when I went back to the same trout stream a few weeks later? · For small flies, do I need to tie all sizes between 18 and 24? · Is a poly leader as good as a sink tip (to a blind horse?) · A seriously disappointing etiquette question (for which I don’t have a good answer) · Why aren’t jig style hooks used more often? View the full article
  8. This week I interview Damon Newpher of Adventure Bound on the Fly, a guide service that specializes in fly fishing from all sorts of craft, including stand-up paddleboards. Damon uses his SUP to chase steelhead, bass, and even muskies in his western New York location, but has ranged as far away as Belize and the Yucatan with inflatable boards, and has even floated remote rivers and lakes in Chile from them. He advises us on why you would want one, what to look for, how to accessorize one, and how to navigate moving water. These craft offer great advantages because they can get into places no other craft can go, with more stealth than any other method. Plus you are up above the water so you can spot fish and subsurface structures easier. And of course an added benefit is that you’ll stay in great shape while you fish! In this week’s Fly Box, we cover, as usual, an eclectic range of things: · Why did my wife get skunked fishing a streamer while I was using two at once? · How to evaluate a fly rod in a shop · Pike fishing from shore · How do I fish emerger flies? · What is the perfect fly rod for tiny streams? · Should I buy a 10-foot 4-weight or 5-weight for tightline nymphing? · Are practice casting rods any good—other than just to torture cats? · And we have a new acronym, thanks to a listener: WINTER. Len from PA gives us great advice on how a fly fisher should spend the winter preparing for spring. View the full article
  9. This week I interview aquatic biologist and fly fisher Peter Stitcher, who not only has a great way of organizing fly boxes (a question I have always neglected to answer properly), he also has some great guidance on how to figure out what is in the river and how to pick a fly from your box that will do the best job of imitating that insect—without any detailed knowledge of entomology. If you learn his acronyms PAUSE and MATCH I am convinced you will have all the knowledge you need to be more successful. Listen to the podcast to learn what these acronyms mean. In The Fly Box, we have all sorts of great questions this week: · The difference between braided and furled leaders · How to Euro nymph rivers with spooky trout · Fishing a midge larva behind a streamer · The difference between “freshwater” and “saltwater” rods · How to transition from saltwater to freshwater fly fishing · Can I use my steelhead reel in salt water? · How to travel with a large net · Tricks for avoiding bulk when tying tiny flies · When to put a fighting trout on the reel · Tips for making very short roll casts · Using cat fur for dubbing · Decreasing hooking mortality on small brookies · How to avoid large cracks in fly lines View the full article
  10. This week’s podcast is my annual bull session with Tim Flagler of Tightline Productions. Instead of us picking a topic, we decided to ask listeners for questions. We both field questions on making a dubbing noodle out of short-fibered dubbing (along with a bunch of other tips on dubbing), choice of articulations for jointed flies, mono weed guards on bonefish flies, black vs. gold beads on nymphs, consistently reproducing patterns, proportions in cutting hair and fur, mixing dubbing to imitate specific insects, the differences between various types of natural dubbings, and discussions on what makes a “good” hackle feather. And of course we ramble a bit. But that’s what fly tiers do when they have an hour to kill. We went on so long that there’s no fly box this week. Just one long fly box, and all about tying. View the full article
  11. After a long Christmas break, we’ve finally gotten back into a regular podcast schedule. This week our guest is Conway Bowman, known for his targeting of large mako sharks on a fly rod. But Conway also loves trout and tarpon fishing, so he gives us his tips on playing and landing large fish on a fly rod, whether it’s a 500-pound mako or a 22-inch trout. Conway is a great teacher and I am sure you will benefit from his tips. In the Fly Box this week, we have questions on taking an extra reel along, dressing for success and comfort in winter, making unweighted saltwater flies ride inverted in the water, factors that make a trout stream great, how to decide whether to go with weight-forward or double-taper lines, streamers in high altitude lakes, casting practice on snow, and a couple of discussions on tippet rings. I hope you enjoy the show View the full article
  12. This week’s podcast is all about snook. I have never done a full podcast just on snook fishing, but it is the most popular gamefish in Florida so I figured it was high time. I enlisted Captain Dan Andrews as a guest. Dan, besides being a lifelong snook chaser and guide, is also executive director of Captains for Clean Water, a great organization that Orvis strongly supports. In the Fly Box this week, we have questions on occasional risers, whether you can handle a 22-inch trout on a 10-foot, 3-weight Recon, smelly head cements, targeting walleyes on the fly, pulling trout out of deep, slow pools, casting weighted streamers on a 5-weight, and some tips for steelhead anglers on the Great Lakes. There is also a story on a most unusual animal that took an angler’s mouse fly—but I won’t spoil the surprise here. View the full article
  13. This week’s interview is with Steve Galletta of Bighorn Angler in Fort Smith, Montana. The Bighorn fishes well all winter long, and with Steve’s many seasons on the river he shares his tips on how to catch tailwater trout all winter long. Even if you don’t plan on fishing the Bighorn any time soon, Steve’s tips will give you valuable intel on how to fish your local tailwater. In The Fly Box, we have questions about the effects of fly flotants on knots, disappearing brook trout, releasing fish in fast water, using switch rods on lakes, why streamers work well in the fall, using UV resins for fly tying, fishing mouse patterns on lakes at night, keeping track of tippet rings, smells on carp flies, and how to apply techniques learned in one fishery to other species and places. View the full article
  14. This week we get a special peak behind the curtain about how fly rods are developed. How long does it take to design a fly rod? How many prototypes are built? How are they tested? How are materials selected? And where do the ideas come from? Shawn Combs takes us into the depths of the Orvis skunkworks and tells us a few secrets (and withholds just as many) about how his team of engineers and technicians develop Orvis fly rods—specifically the new Helios 3 series. In the Fly Box this week, we talk about fishing emergers subsurface, the perils of using the wrong super glue on casting cuts, how long to let a bass popper sit, water temperature guiidelines for trout, fly fishing for crappies, a tip on keeping the trailing hook of a tandem out of the way when tying, leader lengths for stocked trout ponds, species-specific leaders, correct water depth for setting indicators, and how to fish multiple-fly rigs when the flies are barbless. View the full article
  15. This week’s guest is Joe Cermele, fishing editor of Field & Stream magazine and the one-man-band behind the terrific web series “Hook Shots” (if you have not seen his videos they are always fun and offbeat). Joe is wild about fishing big flies for big fish—regardless of species. Our interview is about mousing for trout, a sorta-night-fishing, sorta-streamer-fishing technique that has become popular in recent years. But it’s not about fishing mouse flies for wilderness fish in Alaska or Kamchatka, it’s about fishing them in local, heavily fished rivers. Mousing is a great way to avoid the crowds and catch one of those big trout you seldom see during the day. As usual in The Fly Box we have a wide variety of topics: missing strikes on topwater bass flies, the difference between a desiccant and a flotant (again!), finding tailing carp, fishing streamers and high-stick nymphing in spring creeks, fishing bamboo rods for larger trout, tying with peacock eyes, questions on rod models, when to buy multiple reels as opposed to one reel and an extra spool, trout that disappear in early spring, correct depth for setting your indicator (there isn’t one), deciding which fly-tying tools to put most of your budget into—and finally what is that white rod Pete Kutzer uses for his casting videos? View the full article