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FinnDawg

How to move forward?

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Hello,

I’m fairly new to tying flies, I’ve got my equipment, and have really been enjoying tying when I have time. But I’ve just kind of realized I don’t know how to move forward on what I will be tying. I see tying nymphs as a way of improving technique and skill but I honestly don’t really fish with nymphs all that often. What I enjoy most is fishing bigger streamers (often articulated) on the bow and dry flies in the mountains. I don’t really see a point in buying material for flies I don’t use often and am wondering if I’m hindering progression by skipping nymphs?

Is it to ambitious to go straight to tying streamers, then articulated streamers? Is there a suggested path to progress through? What are some of your suggestions?

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I started with streamers and pike flies. I'm far from an expert but in my opinion one should...

- Tie only what you will use. Unless you're trying to learn to be generalist and sell flies.

- Buy only what you need and cannot substitute.

- Use your imagination. Mix and match.

- Remember that you are tying for the fish and for yourself.

So just because a fly tied on youtube uses one specific material does not mean you can't play around. It's mostly about learning techniques that when put together with certain materials make a fly.  I use the deer hair at the base of my bucktails as the "elk hair" on elk hair caddis. Also as wing material on foam hoppers. Schlappen fathers rather than saddle hackle for my deceivers. Brushed out acrylic yarn as dubbing and fish hair etc. Nobody has complained so far.

There are loads of flies that you can mix and match both materials and techniques to make something fishable and decent looking. Some patterns are more exacting that others and just will not float/fish right unless perfect. Streamers are usually pretty forgiving on that front.

 

 

 

 

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I tie what I can't buy or anything that is too expensive

The only flies I tie are my preferred boatman patterns, and my articulated streamers/intruders

It sounds like you don't enjoy tying nymphs, so don't tie em. 

From a technical standpoint, I think if you skip dries, you will be hindering your progression long term,
but I don't think it would hurt too much if you delayed getting into them tho. Plus quality hackles are expensive.

I think you can jump straight into tying streamers.

Tying in schlappen is pretty good practice for tying in dry hackles.

Stacking or spinning deer hair for your dungeons is lots of fun.
but buy yourself a large stacker and gelspun thread first or it will be frustrating.
And practice spinning and trimming the head first on some junk hooks cause your first few will suck.

Have a play with some rabbit strips in dubbing loops and then composite loops for some awesome leeches

have fun

 

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, sldrose said:

practice spinning and trimming the head first on some junk hooks cause your first few will suck.

You can always salvage a hook by giving it a shave with your exacto knife.

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Personally, I tie what I use/have need for in my fishing.  My principal enjoyment in fly tying comes from innovation, tweaking "standard" patterns with different materials, color combos, etc.  All of my most effective patterns have come from this.

The basic skills/techniques involved are fairly universal, regardless of what you are tying.  So unless you have ambitions to become a commercial tier and feel a need to be able to pound out any and all sorts of flies, I don't think you would be "hindering progression" if you only tied streamers or dries, to the exclusion of nymphs.  I'd say tie what you enjoy tying, and can/will need and use in your fishing.

 

 

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Kelly Galloup has some great videos on streamer tying. He’s posted a bunch recently as well, including ones on setting materials, wrapping hackle, and constructing deer hair/wool heads. His tutorials deal with material selection & preparation, articulation, tying techniques, etc. They are great, and well worth a watch. My streamer box is probably 60% galloup flies, or versions of his patterns I have tweaked. 

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Wow, lots of great information and pointers here. Really appreciate the input guys. Definitely not into commercial tying and mostly want to do it as a creative endeavour and as a way to experiment with those great streamers. 

I have been watching way to much Kelly Galloup videos this week, I really like the way he takes the time to explain the reasons why he ties things a certain way. His videos are great.

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Also, for the guys tying articulated flies, what material are you using to connect your front and back hooks?

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14 hours ago, FinnDawg said:

Also, for the guys tying articulated flies, what material are you using to connect your front and back hooks?

beadalon 0.38 nylon coated stainless 19 strand. from michaels craft.

there is also an 8or 5 ? strand, but apparently more strands the less kinking.
(more relevant for intruders where you may change out the stinger hook occasionally)

Kelly uses beadalon too.

or intruder wire, but intruder wire is more expensive.

 

 

 

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