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TheBrownWhisperer

Recommendations for a 4 weight rod

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Hi all, 

 

I am looking for recommendations for a 4 weight fly rod that will be primarily used for casting dry flies on mountain streams and spring creeks.

Also, pros and cons of 9 foot rod vs something shorter. Currently, I fish with a Hardy Zenith 9 foot 6 weight. 

 

Thanks in advance.

 

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I suspect that everyone that has a favorite 4 wt will recommend that particular brand.  The number of choices is limitless, from fast action graphite to slower, full flex graphite to different glass rods.  I personally have an Orvis mid priced rod.  It's a great rod and you can cast it all day long.  If price is a major consideration, I suggest you have a look at the Echo lineup.  They perform very well and have a warranty as well.its hard to beat the price but broken rods will still be out of service for at least a couple of weeks while they ship you a new section.  TFO rods. Have an outlet in Calgary , they are competitively priced and are worth checking out too.

If you would like to give my Orvis a try, let me know, I'm always up for a fishing trip.

Murray

oops, I forgot to speak about length of rod.  All I can really say is my own personal preference.  All of my small stream rods are shorter.  I find that it is much easier to do a little bush whacking.  The streams are all small as far as width goes and you are not trying to get 60 ft. Casts.  A 30 ft cast is all you really need.

 

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I have several "Dry Fly" specific (small stream, Alpine Lake and Bow River rods) all are graphite. 7' 2wt, 7'6" 3 wt 8',/8'9/9' (x2) 4wt. For clients I offer 9' 4wt & 5 wt - specifically for alpine lakes. Traditional action (soft) and Med/Fast action both work with my casting stroke (have to adjust slightly). Haven't tried glass, but people who fish glass LOVE them, as do folks that fish grass (bamboo)! Shorter rods tend to be more accurate (but obviously depends on your skill), plus work better within overgrown streams.

As with any rod, match something to your price point and casting stroke. Test cast a bunch, and I mean a bunch! Go to a dedicated fly shop with well trained staff. If you have a reel already lined, bring it with you, if not consider something that will balance the rod properly (which is where a dedicated fly shop comes in). Be sure to go with a quality manufacture that has parts to repair the rod (b/c inevitably you will break a tip or section fishing small streams)!

Peter

 

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I tend to fish either glass or bamboo for small streams. Think of it this way, manufacturers have been in a race to produce Graphite rods that have only one purpose, speed, using not only fast stiff rods but many lines tare actually heavier than standard rating (example: 5wit lines that are actually closer to 6). Distance, the race for "newer and better" has been for fast rods that will overreach. These do some undesirable things. They don't load at short distances, are less accurate  plus their inherent stiffness are much tougher on both tippets and fighting fish. Softer rods with a slower stroke will lay out a dry fly lightly without slapping water and give you much more accuracy and save your finer tippet's on large fish in my experience.

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Butter Stick is a popular rod. Not sure of the length but lots of guys like the fiberglass action.

FHD

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I use an echo 3 8’6 4wt. 

Love the action, price and the warranty.

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For my casting stroke, I find I like a rod with an action angle of around 67-68 for fishing dries.  My favorite rod is no longer made, but from what I understand its been replaced with the Loop Opti Stream, which has a similar action.  I think a 9' rod is more versatile if you might need to nymph with it in a pinch, and I find it easier to roll cast with the longer rod, which is usually what I end up doing if I've got brush at my back. 

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The Loop Opti Stream is a great dry fly rod, I mostly use it on the Bow but for mountain streams and spring creeks, which is what the topic is about I do prefer a shorter one. I find a 6 or 7 foot Flyrod to be perfect. Picked up a 7' - 3wt Butterstick, havn't tried it onstream yet but it looks like a winner.

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If you like Hardys consider the Hardy Sirrus glass rod with their sintrix resin. Nice casting rod with that nice fibreglass soul  but with lots of backbone for longer casts and handling fish.

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I would like to thank everyone for their input so far. I have looked at a couple of glass rods and fear that I would have to alter my casting stroke too much because I currently use a fast rod. Will have to keep looking...

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For an entry level rod that won't break the bank, I would consider the medium-fast Redington Path.  We bought it for my son a couple of years ago, and I am surprised at how well it feels in my hand and casts.  I don't think they are still making the 8' 4wt, which is too bad as I think it is a great setup for smaller water.  I use a Winston BIIIX 8.5' 4wt, and while I like it a lot for where I typically fish it, don't really think it is ideal for super skinny water.

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